Someone’s in the kitchen.

When neighbors give you peaches, you halve them, pop a little square of butter and a sprinkling of brown sugar on each, and bake them at 350 for 5-10 minutes, to your taste.  Heap some vanilla ice cream on top and you’ve got yourself a tasty summer treat.

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When a co-worker gives you cherries, you whip up some cherry crisp.  I used this recipe.  Heavy on the crisp because that’s the best part.  IMO.  I failed to snap a picture, but you know what they say, if you’ve seen one crisp, you’ve seen them all.  And I’m not known across the land for being an excellent photographer of the food anyway, so are you missing out?  No.  Just go make the crisp.

As a side note, I don’t own a cherry pitter so I used the tried and true chopstick method and it worked great.  It was messy, but effective.

When you get a craving for cinnamon bread, you scour the internet for bread recipes that don’t require half of day of rise time.  I found this one (for plain bread), halved it because I only needed (and really that need was debatable) one loaf, and I added a ‘roll out smother in brown sugar and cinnamon and melted butter then roll up into a loaf’ step before putting the dough in the bread pan for the final rise.  It turned out beautifully; I began mixing ingredients at 2:48 and was slicing the baked loaf at 5:05 so it was done in the flashiests of flashes.  I may have eaten the entire loaf (minus around four slices which I generously shared with Kevin and co-workers) in a matter of two days.

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^ Business on the outside, responsible party of cinnamon/brown sugar/butter on the inside. ^

I always hold my breath when I bake bread (figuratively, of course, because I want to live to eat the final product) and work with yeast.  It just scares me.  Water too hot?  The yeast dies.  Water too cold?  The yeast dies.  It seems so sensitive.  I’m not sure why I feel this way – I don’t think I’ve ever killed the yeast.  But the fear is real.  I did, at one point, own a bread machine, which was used around three times before it was stashed in a cabinet and forgotten about.  Call me old fashioned, but I prefer to make my bread by hand.  I think the machines just complicate things – especially if you stick to simple recipes, which I always do.

When you want to throw together a high protein snack, you roast some chickpeas.  First I coated them in red pepper flakes, chili powder, a touch of salt, and a smidgeon of brown sugar to cut the spicy.  They were good but I don’t think I roasted them long enough and/or at a high enough temperature.  They were less of a crunchy snack and more of a side dish.  But they would make a great side dish or add in to a casserole or something so I’ll keep my half-fail method in mind.

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What have you been up to in the kitchen recently?

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13 thoughts on “Someone’s in the kitchen.

  1. LOVE ACTUALLY reference!!!!!

    OMG I need to marry someone who can cook like you can. Or get rich and hire someone. I want everything you talked about. Way to go!!!

  2. Baking scares the be-jesus out of me! You’re exactly right, it’s too sensitive. I can just never seem to get the exact right combination. Sadly that means I avoid the kitchen when it comes to leisure activities. I wish I had more of a knack for it. You seem like you’ve got things well under control! Keep up the great recipes!
    -Linds

  3. That bread is what my dreams are made of. I LOVE cinnamon! And bread, obviously. So this is complete and utter perfection.
    So is the cherry crisp. Mouth-watering recipes!

  4. Homemade bread is the best! During the dead of winter, which is the only time we eat lots of soups and stews, I’ll try to make a few loaves most weekends to have throughout the week. But I think I’ll be trying the cinnamon bread recipe sooner than that!!

  5. I agree about the crisp, THE BEST part and I am guilty of eating the top right off the berries. I made roasted chick peas last week for the first time! They were mighty tasty.

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